Articles Posted in Consumer Safety

On January, 8, 2013, The Consumer Product Safety Commission in association with Fisher-Price announced a voluntary recall of the Rock ‘N Play Infant Sleeper due to the risk of mold developing between the removable seat cushion and hard plastic frame of the sleeper. Apparently, mold can develop in this area of the sleeper when it remains damp or is infrequently cleaned. This recall applies to 800,000 Rock ‘N Play Sleepers that have been sold at stores nationwide and on-line Continue Reading

Azek Deck Company describes itself as “the leading brand of ultra low maintenance decking.” Azek Decks are made with proprietary Procell Technology, which is designed to limit the shortfalls associated with traditional wood and composite decking. Azek has represented to consumers that Azek Decks are:

-Stain resistant – Scratch resistant – Split resistant – Mold and mildew resistant – Durable and long lasting – Impervious to moisture and insects – Limited lifetime warranty

Unfortunately, despite these representations, some consumers of Azek Decks have experienced problems with their decks, including staining, extreme fading, scratches, and severe mold and mildew.

A recent NY Times article reports that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to find that some hospitals are unnecessarily performing double CT scans on patients’ chests in order to increase the bill to the healthcare insurance providers. More specifically, the hospitals are performing one CT scan using iodine contrast and one CT scan without the contrast solution. Radiologists say one scan or the other is needed depending on the patient’s condition, but performing two scans in succession is rarely necessary. In addition to the effects this practice is having on health insurance costs and Medicare/Medicaid (over 25 million in 2008), the real concern has to be for the patients who are being unnecessarily exposed to additional radiation. For comparison purposes, two CT scans of the chest would be equal to approximately 700 standard chest X-rays.
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For years, industry and government groups in the U.S. have denied any cancer risk posed by the radiation that is transmitted by cell phones. Earlier this week, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a branch of the World Health Organization (WHO), issued a press release confirming what foreign researchers have been suggesting over the last decade: cell phone radiation may cause cancer.
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Concern about health risks posed by the BP oil spill disaster and the clean up effort is rising amid reports of illnesses among workers helping to clean up the oil spill and residents living along the Gulf Coast. Last week, eleven workers were hospitalized after complaining of nausea, dizziness, chest pain and headaches.
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Hours before the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in April, there were strong warning signs that something was terribly amiss with the well.

There were several “red flags” that suggested a potential sign of an impeding blow out, according to a memorandum addressed to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce from BP. One of the red flags included several equipment readings suggesting that gas was bubbling into the well. Another red flag was a critical decision, 24 hours prior to the explosion, to replace heavy mud in the pipe rising from the seabed with seawater, which possibly increased the risk of an explosion.
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As a result of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in April, fisherman, residents, volunteers, and other workers are being exposed to dangerous chemicals on a daily basis. BP estimates that its underwater siphon is drawing about 5,000 barrels per day; however, others have estimated that the spill could be as big as 20,000 to 100,000 barrels a day.
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